Beaumont's List (Ve...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Beaumont's List (Verified Supercentenarians, LQ, ESO, GRG)

38 Posts
14 Users
61 Reactions
1,602 Views
(@coyote77)
Fan
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 95
 

Posted by: @marco

I think Annie Adonis (ZAF) was black.

Her parents are listed as “coloured” on their death records (they died during the apartheid so everything was racialized at the time). The term “coloured” isn’t very clear.

 


   
ReplyQuote
024Tomi
(@024tomi)
Fan and researcher
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 369
 

@coyote77 Wikipedia says:

"Coloureds (Afrikaans: Kleurlinge) refers to members of multiracial ethnic communities in South Africa who may have ancestry from African, European, and Asian people. The intermixing of different races began in the Cape province of South Africa, with Dutch settlers, African and Malaysian slaves intermixing with the indigenous Khoi tribes of that region. Later various other European nationals also contributed to the growing mixed race people, who would later be officially classified as coloured by the apartheid government in the 1950s.

[...]

The apartheid-era Population Registration Act, 1950 and subsequent amendments, codified the Coloured identity and defined its subgroups, including Cape Coloureds and Malays [...]. As a consequence of Apartheid policies and despite the abolition of the Population Registration Act in 1991, Coloureds are regarded as one of four race groups in South Africa. These groups (blacks, whites, Coloureds and Indians) still tend to have strong racial identities and to classify themselves and others as members of these race groups."

ESO Correspondent for Hungary (since 2020)
GRG Correspondent for Hungary (2020-2023)
Tracker and researcher of Hungarian and other Central European (super)centenarians (since 2016)
Enthusiast of extreme longevity (since childhood)


   
ReplyQuote
(@coyote77)
Fan
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 95
 

@024tomi Here is a photo of her with her youngest brother (the one sitting) and a portrait of her mother:

 


   
024Tomi reacted
ReplyQuote
(@coyote77)
Fan
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 95
 

Posted by: @marco

1910-1913

1912:

--> Merle O'Hara was black;

 

She was actually white. 

 


   
Marco reacted
ReplyQuote
(@coyote77)
Fan
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 95
 

1907:

 

Casilda Benegas de Gallego ----» She wasn't white.

 

People like Noemí Bisso de Zanetta and Rosa Maria Scapol are definetly white though 


   
Marco reacted
ReplyQuote
Marco
(@marco)
Fan
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2971
 

Thanks for the corrections, Coyote!

Overduidelijk misschien.


   
ReplyQuote
MrCatlord
(@mrcatlord)
Supercentenarian Fan
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 831
 

Posted by: @coyote77

1907:

 

Casilda Benegas de Gallego ----» She wasn't white.

 

People like Noemí Bisso de Zanetta and Rosa Maria Scapol are definetly white though 

I feel like the lines between White and Hispanic can be blurry sometimes especially if their ancestry is not known. Inah is listed as white, is she of European ancestry then?

 


   
ReplyQuote
(@coyote77)
Fan
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 95
 

@mrcatlord you’re right! In fact, I’m just following the “a la American” sort of classification. When I first arrived in North America, I was confused about this “Hispanic/Latino” label. But tbh, it’s a good idea to have it so we can show some statistical data about, let’s say, the big amount of African-American SCs even though they have a smaller life expectancy than whites. 

But answering your question, in some cases is definitely confusing. But some cases, the classification is evident. For example, Noemi Bisso and Rosa Scarpol were exclusively of recent European ancestry. All their grandparents were born in Europe (like Alida Grubba). Casilda is from Paraguay, a country where the vast majority of people are mestizo and descendant of the mixture of Guarani women and Spanish men. In fact, Casilda’s preferred language was Guarani, and she herself considered herself latina/mestiza. But in some cases, it is unknown…like Inah, for example. Inah does not have any recent European ancestry, as far as I know, but since southern Brazil was almost entirely colonized by Europeans in the 18th century, she may be indeed white. But in general terms, if someone is Latin American, unless he is exclusively descendant of recent European immigration waves (as it happens with some people in Argentina, Uruguay, South Brazil, etc.), hehe chances that they don’t have a significant amount of Native American/black ancestry in their blood is…almost zero. And genetics are complex so people can have a significant amount of native and black ancestry and yet have light hair, light eyes and white skin. 

In some cases, we can go with self-identification as well. Capovilla is listed as white because she self identified at such.

 

This post was modified 3 weeks ago 2 times by Coyote77

   
MrCatlord reacted
ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2
Share: